WATER CONSERVATION NEWSLETTER, SUMMER 2003


WATER: CONSERVATION OF THIS PRECIOUS AND LIMITED RESOURCE IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE RESIDENTS, PROPERTY OWNERS AND GUESTS OF STINSON BEACH

Consumer's Responsibility: The residents of Stinson Beach are reminded that each individual is considered a guardian and caretaker of our limited water resource. The community relies on the cooperation and judgment of each resident to implement conservation practices and to take precautions to prevent leaks. Despite the unusually high rainfall in April, conservation is still necessary due to the limited storage capacity we have here in Stinson Beach. The ability to provide water in a fire emergency or disaster situation is a year round concern and conservation efforts on behalf of District consumers is instrumental in keeping water supplies at the maximum levels possible. For information on how you can conserve, please visit the District website or office.

Owner's Responsibility: The property owners of Stinson Beach are responsible for all water use/overuse whether or not the property is occupied. District policy does not provide for any monetary reduction considerations if water loss occurs resulting from circumstances within the customer's control. Irrigation systems are the number one cause of extensive leaks and are considered within the control of the customer. Irrigation systems and in-house plumbing should be monitored frequently. All Stinson Beach residents should turn their irrigation water systems off if they plan to be off-premise for an extended period of time. For information on how you can read your own meter for leak detection purposes, please visit the District website or office.

Visitor's Responsibility: Guests of Stinson Beach, whether visiting the beach on a sunny day or renting for an extended period, are also expected to practice water conservation. Residents can help to promote visitor conservation by posting this notice in your home. Additionally, conservation reminder cards for commercial establishments are available at the District office.

BACKFLOW PREVENTION DEVICES: PROTECTION OF THE STINSON BEACH WATER SUPPLY FROM CONTAMINATION

Requirement to Install a Backflow Prevention Device: The California Department of Health Services requires that all water districts implement a program to prevent "cross-connection" (any potential connection between a public water supply and an unapproved supply such as a residential plumbing system, spa, lateral connection, etc.) The District requires installation of a Reduced Pressure Principle Type Backflow Prevention Device in order to prevent contamination of the public (treated) water supply from residential on-site water and wastewater systems. In the past ten years, National water supplies have been contaminated by un-prevented backflow from bathtubs, air conditioners, agricultural pesticides, livestock watering holes, hot-tubs, ponds, pools and many other sources. Ironically, the common garden hose is the most common instrument used to induce backflow contamination. If you have questions regarding the installation, maintenance and testing of backflow prevention devices, please contact the District office.

RATES, CHARGES AND FEES FOR WATER AND WASTEWATER SYSTEM MONITORING

Rate Increases to be Implemented on July 1, 2003: The Stinson Beach County Water District will implement a three percent increase affecting most of the billing charges on July 1, 2003. The District bills customers every two months (six times per year) and utilizes a tiered water use system. Most customer bills have three charges, a basic water fee, a basic wastewater fee and a water usage fee. Detailed information regarding fees, charges, tiers, etc, can be obtained at the District office. The following data summarizes the rate revisions.

STINSON BEACH COUNTY WATER DISTRICT:
COMPARISON OF CURRENT RATES AND INCREASED RATES AS OF JULY 1, 2003

Wastewater Rates: Bimonthly Wastewater Monitoring Program Fee
  Current Effective 7/1/03
Basic Wastewater Fee $59.60 3.0% $61.38
 
Water Rates: Basic Bimonthy Service Charge
  Current Effective 7/1/03
¾" or smaller meter $54.80 3.0% $56.44
1 - inch meter $97.84 3.0% $100.78
1 ½ - inch Meter $226.96 3.0% $233.77
2 - inch meter $442.16 3.0% $455.42
3 - inch meter $743.40 3.0% $765.70

Water Use Charges: Bimonthly Tiered Rate
Tier Usage Range Full Tier CF Current
(per 100 cf)
Total Tier   Effective
7/1/03
(per 100 cf)
Total Tier
Tier  1 1 to 1,200 cubic feet 1200 $1.51 $18.12 3.0% $1.56 $18.72
Tier 2 1,201 to 2,000 cf 800 $3.64 $29.12 3.0% $3.75 $30.00
Tier 3 2,001 to 3,200 cf 1200 $5.84 $70.08 3.0% $6.02 $72.24
Tier 4 3,201 to 4,000 cf 800 $8.02 $64.16 3.0% $8.26 $66.08
Tier 5 4,001 to 6,000 cf 2000 $12.05 $241.00 3.0% $12.41 $248.20
Tier 6 6,001 to 8,000 cf 2000 $15.06 $301.20 3.0% $15.51 $310.20
Tier 7 8,001 cf and above   $19.56     $20.15  

TYPICAL BILLING SCENARIOS FOR SBCWD CUSTOMERS REGARDING RATE CHANGE EFFECTIVE 7/1/03
SCENARIO 1 CURRENT AS OF 7/1/03 DIFFERENCE
TYPICAL RATE FOR CUSTOMER USING 1200 CF* (8,976 GALLONS) PER BILLING PERIOD (20 CF/150 GAL PER DAY AVERAGE) NOTE: 57% OF CUSTOMERS FALL INTO THIS CATEGORY WATER USAGE $18.12 $18.72 $0.60
BASIC WATER FEE (3/4' METER) $54.80 $56.44 $1.64
BASIC WW FEE $59.60 $61.38 $1.78
TOTAL $132.52 $136.54 $4.02
SCENARIO 2
TYPICAL RATE FOR CUSTOMER USING 2000 CF (14,960 GALLONS) PER BILLING PERIOD (34 CF/250 GAL PER DAY AVERAGE) NOTE: 19% OF CUSTOMERS FALL INTO THIS CATEGORY WATER USAGE $47.24 $48.72 $1.48
BASIC WATER FEE (3/4' METER) $54.80 $56.44 $1.64
BASIC WW FEE $59.60 $61.38 $1.78
TOTAL $161.64 $166.54 $4.90
SCENARIO 3
TYPICAL RATE FOR CUSTOMER USING 4000 CF (29,920 GALLONS) PER BILLING PERIOD (67 CF/500 GAL PER DAY AVERAGE) NOTE: 4% OF CUSTOMERS FALL INTO THIS CATEGORY WATER USAGE $181.48 $187.04 $5.56
BASIC WATER FEE (3/4' METER) $54.80 $56.44 $1.64
BASIC WW FEE $59.60 $61.38 $1.78
TOTAL $295.88 $304.86 $8.98
*THE USAGE  AND DOLLAR AMOUNTS IN EACH OF THE FOUR CATEGORIES ABOVE ARE MAXIMUMS, FOR INSTANCE IN SCENARIO ONE, 1200 CF REPRESENTS MAXIMUM USE FOR 57% OF THE CUSTOMERS, MANY CUSTOMERS USE LESS THAN THAT.

Approximate Water Usage Statistics. Note that these figures are an average per person per day. You may use more or less depending on your habits.

  • Automatic dishwasher: 15 gallons per load
  • Hand wash dishes: 10 gallons per meal
  • Bathtub: 35 - 50 gallons
  • Shower: 5 - 6 gallons per minute
  • Toilet flush: 2 - 7 gallons
  • Running faucet: 3 - 5 gallons per minute
  • Brushing teeth or washing hands: 1 - 3 gallons
  • Outdoor hose-bib left running for 24 hours: 4, 320 - 7,200 gallons
  • Clothes Washing Machine: 35 - 50 gallons per load
  • Cooking: 10 gallons per meal
  • Car washing by hand: 100 gallons per car
  • Yard Watering: 5 - 10 gallons per minute
  • Pinhole leak in a running garden hose: up to 170 gallons per day
  • Running toilet: over 60 gallons per day
  • Faucet dripping for one year: 3,280 - 9,125 gallons
  • Outdoor hose-bib left running for 24 hours: 4, 320 - 7,200 gallons

A Few Water Conservation Tips:

  • Know where your water shut off valve is located and ensure that it functions easily.
  • Know how to read your own meter so that you can monitor your usage.
  • Monitor irrigation systems, hoses, pipes, faucets, couplings, toilets and other household water using devices on a regular basis.
  • Turn water system off when leaving the property unoccupied for an extended period of time.
  • Install a master automatic shut off valve for the irrigation system.
  • Reduce grass areas, increase use of drought resistant plants.
  • Use a broom, not a hose, to clean driveways and patios.
  • Hire a maintenance contractor to check unoccupied residences for leaks and other water loss.
  • Install an auxiliary "Meter Display Unit" to easily monitor your own water use.
  • Sparingly water the yard, avoid watering surrounding areas, position sprinklers appropriately.
  • Make sure dishwashers and wash machines are full to capacity before running.
  • Irrigate slowly, deeply and infrequently. Water in morning or evening, not mid-day.
  • Use a shut off nozzle when washing cars and direct overflow in to landscaping.





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