2016 WATER QUALITY/CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT


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Dear Stinson Beach Water Consumer,

We are proud to present you with the District’s 2016 calendar year Water Quality/Consumer Confidence Report in which we had NO water quality violations.

  • We are most proud and thankful for your water conservation success.
  • Water demand has dropped off about 25%, all by voluntary water conservation.

Please give special attention to: "IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR DISTRICT WATER CUSTOMERS" at the bottom of this page.

The Stinson Beach County Water District (SBCWD) tests the drinking water for its consumers as required by State and Federal Regulations. This report shows the results of our monitoring for the period January 1 through December 31, 2016. Enclosed you will find all pertinent information relating to the water quality of Stinson Beach. This report is provided by the SBCWD in cooperation with the California Department of Public Health Services. The District delivers a safe and reliable supply of high quality drinking water, which meets or exceeds all EPA and CDPH standards for water quality monitoring requirements. The water quality is ensured through a series of chemical and bacteriological tests performed on over 200 samples collected annually.

Older, inefficient waterlines are continually being replaced with new ones to provide for greater flow of water, which will improve fire protection and domestic water service. All of the Calles Pipelines and all of the Patios Pipelines have now been replaced.

The District continues to make improvements to its operations and maintenance in an effort to reduce costs, enforce policies and enhance water quality. The District allocates hundreds of thousands of dollars every year for water quality and water distribution improvements. The most important project completed this last year was the successful drilling of a new potable water well at the District’s Water Treatment Plant, which is in the process of being permitted as a production well. Also, new water meters have been installed for most customers, allowing each homeowner to check their water usage remotely by setting up a personalized on-line portal, which enables prompt identification of water leaks. Both projects are being funded by the District’s grant from the State of California Department of Water Resources.

The District’s water tanks are in the process of being sandblasted and painted. Our Capital Improvement Program (CIP) provides for ensuring the reliability and quality of our District’s operations, and for meeting more stringent drinking water requirements during the next five years.

Again, thank you for your water conservation success.

Ed Schmidt, General Manager

WATERSHED SANITARY SURVEY FOR THE DISTRICT: The report is available in the District Office.

WATER SOURCES AND TREATMENT:
The Stinson Beach water supply is provided by two types of sources: surface water and ground water. Surface water is supplied by the Fitzhenry, Black Rock, and Stinson Gulch Creeks. Ground water is supplied by Steep Ravine, Alder Grove, Ranch, and Highlands Wells, which operate intermittently. The collected raw water is piped to the Laurel Treatment Facility. The water is then processed by our Pall Membrane Filters which consist of two parallel units, each rated at 100 gallons per minute. Sodium hypochlorite (chlorine) is added after filtration for disinfection purposes.

REGULATORY AGENCIES:
The world's drinking water supply is provided by rivers, lakes, ponds, springs and wells. As this water moves across the surface or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material or animal/human substances. The Environmental Protection Agency and the State Water Resources Control Board, Division of Drinking Water, have established limits for contaminants in both tap water and bottled water.

POSSIBLE SOURCE WATER CONTAMINANTS:
Microbial Contaminants: Includes viruses and bacteria that come from onsite septic systems, sewage systems, livestock and wildlife.
Inorganic Contaminants: Includes naturally occurring salts and metals, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, and contaminants resulting from mining and farming.
Organic Contaminates: Includes synthetic, volatile chemicals which are by-products of industrial processes, petroleum product runoff, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.
Radioactive Contaminants: Includes naturally occurring or man-made contaminants resulting from gas production and mining.
Pesticide and Herbicide Contaminants: Includes contaminants resulting form agricultural use, residential use and urban storm water runoff.

TERMS USED IN THIS REPORT:

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. Primary MCLs are set as close to the PHGs (or MCLGs) as is economically and technologically feasible. Secondary MCLs are set to protect the odor, taste, and appearance of drinking water.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs are set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA).

Public Health Goal (PHG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. PHGs are set by the California Environmental Protection Agency.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL): The level of a disinfectant added for water treatment that may not be exceeded at the consumer's tap.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG): The level of a disinfectant added for water treatment below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs are set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS): MCLs for contaminants that affect health along with their monitoring and reporting requirements, and water treatment requirements.

Secondary Drinking Water Standards (SDWS): MCLs for contaminants that affect taste, odor, or appearance of the drinking water. Contaminants with SDWSs do not affect the health at the MCL levels.

Treatment Technique (TT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Regulatory Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

Variances and Exemptions: Department permission to exceed an MCL or not comply with a treatment technique under certain conditions.

MPN: most probable numbe

ND: not detectable at testing limit

PPM: parts per million or milligrams per liter (mg/L)

PPB: parts per billion or micrograms per liter (ug/L)

PPT: parts per trillion or nanograms per liter (ng/L)

pCi/L: picocuries per liter (a measure of radiation)

WATER QUALITY TEST RESULTS:
The following tables list all of the drinking water contaminants that were detected during the year 2015. The presence of these contaminants in the water does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. The State Water Resources Control Board, Division of Drinking Water, allows the District to monitor some contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently. For this reason, some of the data is more than one year old. The Stinson Beach County Water District testing results indicated that the water did not exceed any contamination levels in 2015.

WATER HARDNESS:
Many water users are concerned about the hardness of their domestic water supply. Hardness (in water) is caused by compounds of calcium, magnesium, and other minerals. The hardness of Stinson Beach water according to the Water Hardness Scale ranges from 60 to 120 PPM (parts per million) or "Moderately Hard". This information may be used to follow recommended settings when installing dishwashers and washing machines.

Water Hardness Scale:

  • Less than 17.1 Parts per Million: Soft
  • 17.1 - 60 Parts per Million: Slightly Hard
  • 60 - 120 Parts per Million: Moderately Hard
  • 120-180 Parts per Million: Hard
  • Over 180 Parts per Million: Very Hard
WATER HARDNESS
Constituent Sample Date Average Level Detected Range of Detection Levels MCL PHG (MCLG) Typical Source of Contaminant
Hardness 8/16/16 89 PPM 76-97 PPM None None Generally found in ground and surface water

SODIUM:
Sodium is the sixth most abundant element on the earth and is widely distributed in soils, plants, food and water. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has a draft guideline for sodium in drinking water of 20 PPM (or milligrams per liter, mg/L).

SODIUM
Element Sample Date Average Level Detected Range of Detection Levels MCL PHG (MCLG) Typical Source of Contaminant
Sodium 8/16/16 20.75 PPM 18-23 PPM None None Generally found in ground and surface water

DETECTED CONTAMINANTS WITH A PRIMARY DRINKING WATER STANDARD:
California drinking water standards, also referred to as "Maximum Contaminant Levels" (MCL) are divided into two categories; primary and secondary: Primary standards relate to public health issues; Secondary standards relate to aesthetic qualities such as taste, odor and color. In the following table, a value in the "Level Detected" column that exceeds the "MCL" value is out of compliance. The SBCWD has no levels which exceed the MCL.

Arsenic: Some people who drink water-containing arsenic in excess of the MCL over many years could experience skin damage, circulatory problems, or an increased risk of cancer. Samples are drawn monthly and quarterly. Compliance with the Arsenic MCL is based on the running average.
Fluoride: Some people who drink water containing fluoride in excess of the Federal MCL of 4 PPM (mg/L) over many years may get bone disease, including pain and tenderness of the bones. Children who drink water containing fluoride in excess of the state MCL of 2 PPM (mg/L) may get mottled teeth.
Nitrate: Infants below the age of six months who drink water containing nitrate in excess of the MCL may quickly become seriously ill, and, if untreated, may die.

CONTAMINANTS WITH A PRIMARY DRINKING WATER STANDARD
Chemical or Constituent Sample
Date(s)
Level Detected Range of Detection Levels MCL
(MRDL)
PHG
(MRDL/MCLG)
Typical Source of Contaminant
Arsenic 1/26/16
& various
4.64 PPB 2.4-6.8 PPB 10 PPB .004 Erosion of natural deposits
Floride 8/16/16 .1625 PPM .14-.2 PPM 2 PPM 1 PPM
PHG
Erosion of natural deposits
Nitrate (N03) 8/16/16 2.235 PPM <1-6 PPM 45 PPM 45 PPM Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching of from septic systems

CORROSIVE TESTS; LEAD AND COPPER - PRIMARY DRINKING WATER STANDARD:
The District conducts pipeline corrosion testing by monitoring levels of copper and lead in sample households throughout Stinson Beach. In order for the testing results to be in compliance, ninety percent of the tests must remain below the Regulatory Action Level. In 2012, 100% of the tests results were below the Regulatory Action Level. The District has implemented corrosion control treatment and continues to monitor its effectiveness.

Copper is an essential nutrient, but some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over a relatively short amount of time may experience gastrointestinal distress. Some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over many years may suffer liver and kidney damage. People with Wilson's disease should consult their doctor.

Lead levels at your home may be higher than at other residences in the community as a result of materials used in your home's plumbing. Infants and children are typically the most vulnerable to lead in drinking water. If you are concerned about elevated lead levels in you home's water, you may wish to have your water tested. Testing information can be obtained at the District office. Additional information is available form the Safe Drinking Water Hotline 800-426-4791.

CORROSION TESTING; LEAD AND COPPER
Chemical Number of samples collected 90th percentile level detected Number Sites exceeding Action Level Regulatory Action Level PHG Typical Source of Contaminant
Lead 10 <.005 PPM 0 .015 PPM .002 PPM Internal corrosion of household water plumbing systems; discharges from industrial manufacturers; erosion of natural deposits.
Copper 10 .650 PPM 0 1.3 PPM 0.17 PPM Internal corrosion of household water plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives.

DETECTED CONTAMINANTS WITH A SECONDARY DRINKING WATER STANDARD:
Secondary drinking water standards relate to aesthetic qualities such as taste, odor and color. In the following tables, a value in the "Level Detected" column that exceeds the "MCL" value is out of compliance. The SBCWD has no levels that exceed the MCL.

CONTAMINANTS WITH A SECONDARY DRINKING WATER STANDARD
Chemical or Constituent Sample Date Level Detected Range of Detection Levels MCL PHG
(MCLG)
Typical Source of Contaminant
Chloride 8/16/16 22.75 PPM 17-26 PPM 500 PPM N/A Runoff, leaching of natural deposits; Seawater influence
Sulfate 8/16/16 20.75 PPM 14-29 PPM 500 PPM N/A Runoff, leaching from natural deposits
Total Dissolved Solids 8/16/16 187.5 PPM 180-200 PPM 1000 PPM N/A Runoff, leaching from natural deposits
Color 8/16/16 7 Units 3-15 Units 15 Units N/A Naturally occurring organic materials
Odor 8/16/16 <1 units <1.0 Units 3 Units N/A Naturally occurring organic materials
Specific Conductance 8/16/16 310 umhos/cm 290-330 umhos/cm 1600 umhos/cm N/A Substances that form ions when in water, seawater influence


SAMPLING RESULTS SHOWING FECAL INDICATOR-POSITIVE GROUND WATER SOURCE SAMPLES
Microbiological Contaminants
(complete if fecal-indicator detected)
Total No. of Detections Sample Dates MCL
[MRDL]
PHG
(MCLG)
[MRDL]
Typical Source of Contaminant
E. coli 0 N/A 0 0 Human and animal fecal waste


SAMPLING RESULTS SHOWING TREATMENT OF SURFACE WATER SOURCES
Treatment Technique
(Type of approved filtration technology used)
Membrane
Turbidity Performance Standards
(that must be met through the water treatment process)
Turbidity of the filtered water must:
1 - Be less than or equal to 0.1 NTU in 95% of measurements in a month.
2 - Not exceed 1.0 NTU for more than eight consecutive hours.
3 - Not exceed 5.0 NTU at any time.
Lowest monthly percentage of samples that met Turbidity
Performance Standard No. 1.
100%
Highest single turbidity measurement during the year .147
Number of violations of any surface water treatment requirements 0

IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR DISTRICT WATER CUSTOMERS:

OWNERSHIP RESPONSIBILITIES:
The responsibility for water usage and any related leaks resides with the property owner. Immediate detection of water leaks is essential for maintaining a minimal rate charge. The SBCWD recommends that those rate payers who do not reside permanently at their Stinson Beach property (i.e.: rentals or seasonal use) turn their water off when they are not at home (unless there is a fire sprinkler system) and/or hire a qualified maintenance contractor to periodically examine water lines, check meter readings, inspect grounds for leaks, etc., Irrigation systems should be checked on a regular basis, as they are the major cause of undetected extensive leaks which result in extremely high water bills.

Customers who have received a new meter can set up a personalized on-line portal to monitor their water usage. You will receive instructions in the monthly bill for accessing and setting up a personalized on-line portal. If you do not receive instructions, then you don’t have a new meter yet, or you received instructions in last month’s bill. When setting up your personalized water portal by logging on to EyeOnWater, make sure that you use the 94970 zip code. Your account number is on your bill. The District recommends setting your water portal to “Intermittent use” and “1 gallon per hour” for your leak alert. You don’t have to use the on-line portal, but many people have reported it as helpful. If you use it, you will have easy access to your daily water consumption. If you set your leak alert, you will receive an e-mail or text message letting you know if your system has a leak (a leak equals 24 hours of continuous flow). Note: the meter portal checks in one time daily with the previous day’s use. Please give us a call if you have any questions (415) 868-1333.

DID YOU KNOW?: The Stinson Beach County Water District's total storage capacity for water is 1,269,000 gallons. If one consumer had an undetected leak equaling 30,000 gallons per day, he/she would deplete one third of the available water in Stinson Beach within two weeks. This actually happened in 2000. Please monitor your water usage and periodically check for leaks!

SHOCK LOADING ONSITE SEPTIC SYSTEMS:
As a resident of Stinson Beach, you are aware that each home in our community has its own onsite septic system to treat wastewater. Each system has a corresponding Discharge Permit which allows the homeowner to operate the onsite septic system. Valuable information is included in that Discharge Permit including the gallon per day limits that may be loaded in to the system. Exceeding these limits is detrimental to your system. Greatly exceeding these limits in a relatively short period of time is referred to as "shock loading" and is one of the most damaging procedures to your septic system. Shock Loading is a violation of your Discharge Permit. Entertaining a large group of individuals or doing a large number of laundry loads on the same day are examples of shock loading. If you want a copy of your permit, or if you just want to know your gallon/day limit, call us at 415-868-1333.

PLANTS ARE HARMFUL TO ONSITE SEPTIC SYSTEMS:
Trees or large shrubs should not be planted on or near sand filters, leachfields or mounds. Trees that are especially suspect include Monterey Pine, Monterey Cypress, Eucalyptus, Willow, Bay Pepper, Poplar, Alder, Aspen, Mayten and Birch. Roots from the Juniper and Echium plant have caused major damage to systems. Ivy and Ice Plant retain too much water, restrict the transfer of oxygen, and clog pipes. We do not recommend these plants around systems.

DISTRICT MOSQUITO ABATEMENT POLICY:
In order to control mosquito breeding, the District is now requiring that all property owners install a screening device on any plumbing vents that vent to the roof of the residence. Please be advised that the District recommends this installation be performed by a licensed contractor such as a roofer, chimney sweep, or maintenance person, with adequate liability insurance. Screening kits are available at the District office. The SBCWD wastewater system inspector will be checking your roof vents for screening as well as your riser seals to ensure that they are water tight to discourage mosquito breeding. The property owner may wish to check his or her own riser lids for adequate sealing. Call 415-868-1333 if you have any questions about this process.

DID YOU KNOW?: The most effective way to prevent the spread of West Nile Virus continues to be the elimination of breeding grounds. Remember to "Dump It, Flip It and Drain It" to eliminate all standing water.




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